Running Kubernetes 1.10 using MiniKube on Windows 10 (adding kubectl and helm/tiller)

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Some quick steps to get Minikube for K8S 1.10 up and running on Windows 10 (presuming VirtualBox has already been installed)

Download kubectl binary from: https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/v1.11.0/bin/windows/amd64/kubectl.exe 

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Copy kubectl.exe to any directory of your liking; add that directory to the PATH environment variable.

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Download minikube from https://github.com/kubernetes/minikube/releases 

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Download the minikube-windows-amd64.exe file, rename it to minikube.exe and add it to the same directory as the kubectl.exe file – or to any other directory included in the PATH variable.

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Follow Quick start instructions: https://kubernetes.io/docs/setup/minikube/#quickstart 

minikube start

Some downloading will take place:

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And after a little while, the minikube cluster is started in VirtualBox:

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At this point, we start running a Pod – then exposing it and finally accessing it:

kubectl run hello-minikube –image=k8s.gcr.io/echoserver:1.10 –port=8080

kubectl expose deployment hello-minikube –type=NodePort

inspect Pod:

kubectl get pod

inspect service:

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Retrieve the IP address for the Minikube cluster:

minikube ip

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Now access the service running inside Kubernetes from the browser running on the host laptop machine:

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And with that, Kubernetes is set up and ready for business.

Open the dashboard:

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and the browser will show:

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One additional step: installation of Helm in Minikube – based on this article: https://medium.com/@JockDaRock/take-the-helm-with-kubernetes-on-windows-c2cd4373104b 

Download the latest version of the compressed executable from the Helm github site, https://github.com/kubernetes/helm/releases.

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Click the windows link and it should download to your computer.

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Extract file helm.exe in folder windows-amd64 inside the archive to – for example – C:\Apps\kubernetes – a directory in the PATH variable

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Now we can run Helm from the command line:

helm

and install the server side component – Tiller – into minikube:

helm init

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Visit the KubeApps site, https://hub.kubeapps.com/, to see what helm charts are currently available and instructions on how to install them.

About Author

Lucas Jellema, active in IT (and with Oracle) since 1994. Oracle ACE Director and Oracle Developer Champion. Solution architect and developer on diverse areas including SQL, JavaScript, Docker, Machine Learning, Java, SOA and microservices, events in various shapes and forms and many other things. Author of the Oracle Press books: Oracle SOA Suite 11g Handbook and Oracle SOA Suite 12c Handbook. Frequent presenter on community events and conferences such as JavaOne, Oracle Code and Oracle OpenWorld.

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