ADF Performance Monitor New Version 9.5

Frank Houweling

We have again a major new version of the ADF Performance Monitor available – version 9.5 ! We have added many new valuable features and improvements. Many overview screens have got a facelift and new charts. In several blogs I will write on them.

This blog is on one of those new features, automatic SLA and health warnings. The monitor will automatically interpret the metrics and will show warnings if the ADF application is not meeting the configured SLA thresholds. Or if configured JVM and system health thresholds are not met – like JVM garbage collection, JVM CPU load, system CPU load, OS memory, database, webservice, application server, network, and browser. From now on it will be even more fast and simple to interpret the metrics. You do not have to be a performance expert/engineer, the monitor will already show the (type of) problems!

SLA Monitoring

A service-level agreement (SLA) is a commitment between a service provider and a client. Aspects of the service – quality, availability, responsibilities – are agreed between the service provider and the service user in a contract. In the world of web applications, frequently part of such a contract are the HTTP response times – to make performance guarantees. For example, one company could have in an SLA contract: 80% of the requests must be processed within 1 second, 95% within 2 seconds, and 5% or less is allowed to be slower than 2 seconds.

In this new release the following SLA critical warnings are configurable:

  • AVG Total Response time (average total response time; including time in database, webservices, application server, network to the client and browser load time)
  • AVG Server Response Time  (average application server process time – including time in database, and webservices)
  • Slow Request % (it is configurable what is SLOW, for example between 1 and 2 seconds)
  • Very Slow Request % (it is configurable what is VERY SLOW, for example everything slower than 1.5 seconds)
  • Error %

Read the whole article on our ADF Performance Monitor website

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