ADF Performance Tuning: Avoid a Long Browser Load Time


It is not always easy to troubleshoot ADF performance problems – it is often complicated. Many parts needs to be measured, analyzed and considered. While looking for performance problems at the usual suspects (ADF application, database, network), the real problem can also be found in the often overlooked browser load time. The browser load time is just an important part of the HTTP request and response handling as is the time spent in the applicationserver, database and network. The browser load time can take a few seconds extra time on top of the server and network process time before the end-user receives the HTTP response and can continue with his work. Especially if the browser needs to build a very very ‘rich’ ADF page – the browser needs to build and process the very large DOM-tree. The end-user needs to wait then for seconds, even in modern browsers as Google Chrome, Firefox and Microsoft Edge. Often this is caused by a ‘bad’ page design where too much ADF components are rendered and displayed at the same time; too many table columns and rows, but also too many other components can cause a slow browser load time. This blog shows an example, analyses the browser load time in the ADF Performance Monitor, and suggest simple page design considerations to prevent a large browser load time.

Read more on – our new website on the ADF Performance Monitor.

About Author

Frank Houweling is an Oracle ADF, Java and performance specialist. During the past years he has been requested several times as troubleshooter of ADF projects with bad performance. As such he has been performing performance analysis, bottleneck detection and developing mitigating solutions based on these analysis. He is also the creator of the ADF Performance Monitor, an advanced monitor that can identify, report and help solve performance bottlenecks in ADF applications.

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