Using ADF DVT Bubble Chart to display the number of goals per match per city at the World Cup Football 2014

Lucas Jellema

The final result – which is obtained in an incredibly easy manner – is shown in the next figure:

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The bubble chart shows bubbles per match. The X and Y coordinate of the match-bubble are taken as longitude and lattitude. That means, the bubbles are roughly laid out in the chart in the same way as the cities are laid out on a map (and indeed in the real world). The size of each bubble corresponds with the total number of goals scored in the match. The smallest bubble corresponds to a 0-0, the largest represents 6 goals in the Spain vs Netherlands match in Salvador. The color indicates the group – with red (and circles) for Group A and lighter blue (or is that lavender?) and diamonds for group B. Dark blue squares is group C.

I was looking for a correlation between the lattitude (south to north position) and the number of goals scored – but so far that correlation is not found.

In this example, I am using the queries and data from some of my previous World Cup related articles – such as https://technology.amis.nl/2014/06/24/sql-challenge-drilling-down-into-world-cup-football-tag-cloud/.

Using the query that lists all matches – with some small changes to return the longitude and lattitude as negative values which creates a more recognizable representations – I have created a read only View Object

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and added it to a default Application Module. This results in a Data Control with Collection.

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To create the page with bubble chart, I created a new Page and drag the MatchResultsVw collection to the page. Drop as Chart, select BubbleChart and configure like this:

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Then close the wizard and run the page. It is literally all it takes.

 

 

Resources:

Frank Houweling’s fine explanation of Bubble Charts: https://technology.amis.nl/2013/03/13/adf-dvt-speed-date-interactive-bubble-graph/

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